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The Resource "They say/I say" : the moves that matter in academic writing : with readings, Gerald Graff, Cathy Birkenstein, Russel Durst

"They say/I say" : the moves that matter in academic writing : with readings, Gerald Graff, Cathy Birkenstein, Russel Durst

Label
"They say/I say" : the moves that matter in academic writing : with readings
Title
"They say/I say"
Title remainder
the moves that matter in academic writing : with readings
Statement of responsibility
Gerald Graff, Cathy Birkenstein, Russel Durst
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Overview: They Say / I Say demystifies academic writing by identifying its key rhetorical moves, the most important of which is to summarize what others have said ("they say") to set up one's own argument ("I say"). The book also provides templates to help students make these key moves in their own writing. This version includes readings that demonstrate those moves-and provide stimulating conversations for them to enter. The Second Edition includes an anthology of 44 readings that will provoke students to think-and write-about five important issues, including two new ones: Is Higher Education Worth the Price? and Why Does It Matter Who Wins the Big Game?
Cataloging source
DLC
Dewey number
808/.042
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
PE1431
LC item number
.G73 2012
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • bibliography
  • handbooks
Label
"They say/I say" : the moves that matter in academic writing : with readings, Gerald Graff, Cathy Birkenstein, Russel Durst
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • "Her point is": Art of summarizing
  • 3:
  • "As he himself puts it": The art of quoting
  • Part 2:
  • "I Say"
  • 4:
  • "Yes / no / okay, but": Three ways to respond
  • 5:
  • "And yet": Distinguishing what you say from what they say
  • 6:
  • Preface
  • "Skeptics may object": Planting a naysayer in your text
  • 7:
  • "So what? Who cares?": Saying why it matters
  • Part 3:
  • Tying It All Together:
  • 8:
  • "As a result": Connecting the parts
  • 9:
  • "Ain't so/Is not": Academic writing doesn't always mean setting aside your own voice
  • 10:
  • Preface to "They Say/I Say"
  • "But don't get me wrong": The art of metacommentary
  • Part 4:
  • Entering the Conversation:
  • 11:
  • "I take your point": Entering class discussions
  • 12:
  • "What's motivating this writer?": Reading for the conversation
  • 13:
  • "Analyze this": Writing in the social sciences
  • Erin Ackerman
  • Introduction: Entering the conversation
  • Readings:
  • 14:
  • Is higher education worth the price?
  • Are colleges worth the price of admission?
  • Andrew Hacker and Claudia Dreifus
  • The new liberal arts
  • Sanford J. Ungar
  • Kenyon commencement speech
  • David Foster Wallace
  • Two years are better than four
  • Part 1:
  • Liz Addison
  • Why do you think they're called for-profit colleges?
  • Kevin Carey
  • Are too many people going to college?
  • Charles Murray
  • Blue-collar brilliance
  • Mike Rose
  • A lifetime of student debt? Not likely
  • Robin Wilson
  • "They Say":
  • 1:
  • "They say": Starting with what others are saying
  • 2:
  • Small change: why the revolution will not be tweeted
  • Malcolm Gladwell
  • Reforming Egypt in 140 characters?
  • Dennis Baron
  • 2b or not 2b?
  • David Crystal
  • The I.M.s of Romeo and Juliet
  • Roz Chast
  • Extra lives: Why video games matter
  • Tom Bissell
  • 15:
  • The good, the bad, and the Daily show
  • Jason Zinser
  • Hidden intellectualism
  • Gerald Graff
  • 16:
  • Is fast food the new tobacco?
  • Don't blame the eater
  • David Zincenko
  • What you eat is your business
  • Radley Balko
  • Is pop culture actually good for you?
  • Junking junk food
  • Judith Warner
  • Kentucky town of Manchester illustrates national obesity crisis
  • Wil Haygood
  • Remarks to the NAACP
  • Michelle Obama
  • Escape from the western diet
  • Michael Pollan
  • Food as thought: Resisting the moralization of eating
  • Mary Maxfield
  • Watching TV makes you smarter
  • Fat is a feminist issue
  • Susie Orbach
  • Having it his way: the construction of masculinity in fast-food TV advertising
  • Carrie Packwood Freeman and Debra Merskin
  • 17:
  • Why does it matter who wins the big game?
  • Champion of the world
  • Maya Angelou
  • Why sports matter
  • Wilfrid Sheed
  • Steven Johnson
  • Women who hit very hard and how they've changed tennis
  • Michael Kimmelman
  • In defense of cheering
  • Jennie Yabroff
  • How I learned to love football
  • Felisa Rogers
  • Move over boys, make room in the crease
  • Sara Maratta
  • We, the public, place the best athletes on pedestals
  • William Moller
  • Thinking outside the idiot box
  • Cheating and CHEATING
  • Joe Posnanski
  • 18:
  • What's up with the American dream?
  • Hiding from reality
  • Bob Herbert
  • Is the American dream over?
  • Cal Thomas
  • The American dream: dead, alive, or on hold?
  • Brandon King
  • Dana Stevens
  • Income inequality: too big to ignore
  • Robert H. Frank
  • Confronting inequality
  • Paul Krugman
  • Up against Wal-Mart
  • Karen Olsson
  • Progressive Wal-Mart. Really
  • Sebastian Mallaby
  • Predatory lending and the devouring of the American dream
  • Constance M. Ruzich and A.J. Grant
  • Family Guy and Freud
  • A more perfect union
  • Barack Obama
  • Permissions, acknowledgments
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index of templates
  • Index of authors and titles
  • Antonia Peacocke
Control code
ocn754105743
Dimensions
19 cm.
Edition
2nd ed.
Extent
xxix, 701 p.
Isbn
9780393912753
Isbn Type
(pbk.)
Lccn
2011039045
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
(OCoLC)754105743
Label
"They say/I say" : the moves that matter in academic writing : with readings, Gerald Graff, Cathy Birkenstein, Russel Durst
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • "Her point is": Art of summarizing
  • 3:
  • "As he himself puts it": The art of quoting
  • Part 2:
  • "I Say"
  • 4:
  • "Yes / no / okay, but": Three ways to respond
  • 5:
  • "And yet": Distinguishing what you say from what they say
  • 6:
  • Preface
  • "Skeptics may object": Planting a naysayer in your text
  • 7:
  • "So what? Who cares?": Saying why it matters
  • Part 3:
  • Tying It All Together:
  • 8:
  • "As a result": Connecting the parts
  • 9:
  • "Ain't so/Is not": Academic writing doesn't always mean setting aside your own voice
  • 10:
  • Preface to "They Say/I Say"
  • "But don't get me wrong": The art of metacommentary
  • Part 4:
  • Entering the Conversation:
  • 11:
  • "I take your point": Entering class discussions
  • 12:
  • "What's motivating this writer?": Reading for the conversation
  • 13:
  • "Analyze this": Writing in the social sciences
  • Erin Ackerman
  • Introduction: Entering the conversation
  • Readings:
  • 14:
  • Is higher education worth the price?
  • Are colleges worth the price of admission?
  • Andrew Hacker and Claudia Dreifus
  • The new liberal arts
  • Sanford J. Ungar
  • Kenyon commencement speech
  • David Foster Wallace
  • Two years are better than four
  • Part 1:
  • Liz Addison
  • Why do you think they're called for-profit colleges?
  • Kevin Carey
  • Are too many people going to college?
  • Charles Murray
  • Blue-collar brilliance
  • Mike Rose
  • A lifetime of student debt? Not likely
  • Robin Wilson
  • "They Say":
  • 1:
  • "They say": Starting with what others are saying
  • 2:
  • Small change: why the revolution will not be tweeted
  • Malcolm Gladwell
  • Reforming Egypt in 140 characters?
  • Dennis Baron
  • 2b or not 2b?
  • David Crystal
  • The I.M.s of Romeo and Juliet
  • Roz Chast
  • Extra lives: Why video games matter
  • Tom Bissell
  • 15:
  • The good, the bad, and the Daily show
  • Jason Zinser
  • Hidden intellectualism
  • Gerald Graff
  • 16:
  • Is fast food the new tobacco?
  • Don't blame the eater
  • David Zincenko
  • What you eat is your business
  • Radley Balko
  • Is pop culture actually good for you?
  • Junking junk food
  • Judith Warner
  • Kentucky town of Manchester illustrates national obesity crisis
  • Wil Haygood
  • Remarks to the NAACP
  • Michelle Obama
  • Escape from the western diet
  • Michael Pollan
  • Food as thought: Resisting the moralization of eating
  • Mary Maxfield
  • Watching TV makes you smarter
  • Fat is a feminist issue
  • Susie Orbach
  • Having it his way: the construction of masculinity in fast-food TV advertising
  • Carrie Packwood Freeman and Debra Merskin
  • 17:
  • Why does it matter who wins the big game?
  • Champion of the world
  • Maya Angelou
  • Why sports matter
  • Wilfrid Sheed
  • Steven Johnson
  • Women who hit very hard and how they've changed tennis
  • Michael Kimmelman
  • In defense of cheering
  • Jennie Yabroff
  • How I learned to love football
  • Felisa Rogers
  • Move over boys, make room in the crease
  • Sara Maratta
  • We, the public, place the best athletes on pedestals
  • William Moller
  • Thinking outside the idiot box
  • Cheating and CHEATING
  • Joe Posnanski
  • 18:
  • What's up with the American dream?
  • Hiding from reality
  • Bob Herbert
  • Is the American dream over?
  • Cal Thomas
  • The American dream: dead, alive, or on hold?
  • Brandon King
  • Dana Stevens
  • Income inequality: too big to ignore
  • Robert H. Frank
  • Confronting inequality
  • Paul Krugman
  • Up against Wal-Mart
  • Karen Olsson
  • Progressive Wal-Mart. Really
  • Sebastian Mallaby
  • Predatory lending and the devouring of the American dream
  • Constance M. Ruzich and A.J. Grant
  • Family Guy and Freud
  • A more perfect union
  • Barack Obama
  • Permissions, acknowledgments
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index of templates
  • Index of authors and titles
  • Antonia Peacocke
Control code
ocn754105743
Dimensions
19 cm.
Edition
2nd ed.
Extent
xxix, 701 p.
Isbn
9780393912753
Isbn Type
(pbk.)
Lccn
2011039045
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
(OCoLC)754105743

Library Locations

    • Farmington Public LibraryBorrow it
      2101 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, NM, 87401, US
      36.7496343 -108.1809457
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